The Complete Trump Immigration Reform Plan

August 19, 2015

The Donald Trump Immigration Reform plan has three core principles.

3 core trump

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FEMA Meets Obama’s FEMA Corps

November 3, 2012

What would be the difference between FEMA and FEMA Corps as displayed in this photo?

According to the AmeriCorps website: On March 13, 2012, the White House announced an innovative partnership between the Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS) to establish a FEMA-devoted unit of 1,600 service corps members within AmeriCorps National Civilian Community Corps (NCCC) solely devoted to disaster preparedness, response, and recovery.

AmeriCorps is a signature program of Public Allies. President Obama was a member of the founding advisory board of Public Allies. First Lady Michelle was the founding Executive Director of Public Allies Chicago from Spring, 1993 until Fall, 1996, and served on the national board of directors from 1997 until 2001.

Obama’s AmeriCorps gives these jobs to high school dropouts with sweet benefits of childcare assistance, education award upon successful completion of service, housing, health coverage, living allowance, stipend, and training while the rest of America suffers with an 8% unemployment, a 50% unemployment rate for college grads, and veterans who can’t find jobs.

The job posting requires: An education level of less than high school completed

Age requirement: between 18 and 24 years of age

The program benefits/terms: Childcare assistance if eligible, Education award upon successful completion of service, Housing, Health Coverage, Living Allowance, Stipend, Training, Uniforms provided

As a reference point, Public Allies advertises the stipend it provides as $1,300 to $1,800 a month.

Guess who’s paying for this?

FEMA Corps job posting

 


Are you sure you’re the middle class?

November 15, 2011

Are you sure you’re part of the middle class that our President vows to help? Do you know where you fit as a wage earner against other American wage earners?

According to the US government:

$10,890 is poverty level

$26,364 is middle class

Top 10% earn $50,000+

Top 1% (primarily doctors) earn $343,000+

The average salary of: police officer ($50K salary with an additional $22,000 in benefits)

The average salary of a teacher is ($50K salary with an additional $22,000 in benefits)

The average salary of an E1 Army Recruit is ($16K salary with an additional $12,000 in benefits) Add additional monies to the benefits package if recruit has dependents.


Congress introduces Amendment to strike Presidential term limit

January 19, 2011

An amendment to the Constitution of the United States to repeal term limits of President has been introduced

serrano-obama

Jose’ E. Serrano of New York (w/Obama inset)

On January 7, 2011 – the first week in session by the 112th Congress — a joint resolution was introduced into the House of Representatives by Mr. Jose’ E. Serrano of New York (D) which was referred to the House Committee on the Judiciary.

Democratic Congressman Jose’ E. Serrano of New York, born in 1943,  has served in Congress since 1990.

–JOINT RESOLUTION–

An amendment to the Constitution of the United States has been proposed to repeal the twenty-second article of amendment, thereby removing the limitation on the number of terms an individual may serve as President.

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled   (two-thirds of each House concurring therein), That the following article is proposed as an amendment to the Constitution of the United States, which shall be valid to all intents and purposes as part of the Constitution when ratified by the legislatures of three-fourths of the several States within seven years after the date of its submission for ratification:

HJ RES 17

What is a Joint Resolution?
A joint resolution is a legislative proposal that requires the approval of both houses and the signature of the President, just as a bill does. Resolutions from each house are assigned a number in the order in which they are introduced, starting at the beginning of each Congress (first and second sessions). There is no real difference between a bill and a joint resolution. Joint resolutions generally are used for limited matters, such as a single appropriation for a specific purpose. They are also used to propose amendments to the Constitution. A joint resolution has the force of law, if approved. Joint resolutions become a part of the Constitution when three-quarters of the states have ratified them; they do not require the President’s signature.


New change announced of foreign national jobs in US

January 16, 2011

A January 14, 2011 press release titled, “New Countries Eligible to Participate in H-2A and H-2B Programs” by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has announced the addition of more countries allowed to participate in US job fulfillment by foreign nationals.

An increase of 15 countries are now eligible to participate in the program bringing the total number of countries to 53.

What is the H-2A and H-2B program?

The H-2A program allows U.S. employers to bring foreign nationals to the United States to fill temporary agricultural labor and service jobs. The number of requests for H-2A certifications in Fiscal Year (FY) 2009 increased by over 6 percent from FY 2008, while the number of positions certified in FY 2009 also experienced an increase of almost 5 percent over FY 2008. There is no H-2A numerical limitation (cap)

The H-2B program allows U.S. employers to bring foreign nationals to the United States for temporary nonagricultural jobs which include resort and hospitality services, retail sales, landscaping, food service and processing, and construction. FY 2008 to FY 2009 showed a 25% decrease in requests for positions and employer demand for H-2B workers showed additional decline from the previous fiscal year. There is a 66,000 H-2B numerical limitation (cap)

Countries include: Argentina, Australia, Barbados, Belize, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, Costa Rica, Croatia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Estonia, Ethiopia, Fiji, Guatemala, Honduras, Hungary, Ireland, Israel, Jamaica, Japan, Kiribati, Latvia, Lithuania, Macedonia, Mexico, Moldova, Nauru, The Netherlands, Nicaragua, New Zealand, Norway, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Romania, Samoa, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, South Korea, Tonga, Turkey, Tuvalu, Ukraine, United Kingdom, Uruguay, and Vanuatu.  Of these countries, the following were designated for the first time this year:  Barbados, Estonia, Fiji, Hungary, Kiribati, Latvia, Macedonia, Nauru, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, and Vanuatu.

Source: The 2009 Foreign Labor Certification Report issued by the US Government

Source: The 2009 Foreign Labor Certification Report issued by the US Government


Federal recovery funds — who’s getting the lions share

July 5, 2010

Whatever happened to the stimulus funds? Who benefited? Who didn’t? After compiling an extensive spreadsheet* it’s time to share it with you … from then to now. A state by state breakdown is at the end of this post.

Before Barack Obama was inaugurated to the most powerful office in the world on January 20, 2009 his cries of acting “swiftly and boldly” for passage of the stimulus bill were heard across the country. Declarations were made that the $787 stimulus bill would prevent millions of job losses from occurring.

A media frenzy ensued:
Nov. 24, 2008–(MSNBC) Obama calls for aggressive stimulus
Nov. 24, 2008–(NY Daily News) Obama to Congress: ‘Act quickly’ on stimulus package to create jobs
Dec. 3, 2008–(TimesArgus) Obama to governors: Help is coming quickly for states
Dec. 7, 2008–(Bloomberg) Obama says economy will worsen before recovery begins n
Jan. 27, 2009–(NY Daily News) GOP leaders tell rank and file to oppose Obama’s $825B bailout — even after concessions

Before taking office, Obama said the economic recovery was more important than the “enormous” federal budget deficit he would inherit “and that means that we can’t worry, short term, about the budget deficit.”

Since President Obama took office:
Within a month of the historic Presidential Inauguration, a $787 billion  American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) was signed into law on February 17, 2009 by President Barack Obama. In fact — the AARA was the 2nd stimulus package — the first was passed by President Bush a year earlier for $168 billion.

Sixteen months later unemployment has gone from 7.7% to 9.7% (Jan. 2009-May 2010) and the battle cry for another stimulus bill is being called for — even though the $787 billion ARRA funds have not been completely distributed.

Sixteen months later the public debt stands at $13.2 Trillion from the previous $10.6 Trillion debt of January 20, 2009 (Jan. 2009-July 2010). This debt represents figures in the HISTORY of our country. Eighteen months ago “we” had an accumulated debt of $10.6T in the HISTORY of our country. Within eighteen months, “our” debt has increased by about one third more. By contrast our public debt stood at $5.7T when President Bush took office in Jan. 2001. President Clinton did run a balanced budget but did not wipe out our debt —  rather than cut spending President Clinton generated monumental revenue by collecting future tax income during his administration through the Roth IRA conversion — a financial stunt President Obama is also offering — with some new carrots to entice the public. The public debt was nearly $4.2T when President Clinton took office in Jan. 1993.

Bank failures:
January-June  2010: 96
January-June 2009: 45
Total 2009 failures: 171

Home reposessions — May 2010 marked a record monthly high for the second month in a row of home reposessions. Up 1% from April and an increase of 44 percent from May 2009. All 50 states posted year-over-year foreclosure increases. Nevada, Arizona, Florida had the highest foreclosure (1 in 79 homes) notices in May 2010.

Some questions I had:
Did blue states make out better than red states like some theorists contend?

Did the ARRA achieve it’s goals of providing provisions for immediate federal tax cuts and incentives, an expansion of unemployment benefits and other social entitlement programs?

Did the 28 federal agencies who received recovery funds to finance contracts, grants, and loans around the country complete their task?

Statistics to date:
Note: While compiling the information off of the official government website set up specifically for “transparency” I noted repeatedly that information from one page to another was not consistent  (garbage in/garbage out theory may be in play). Further, the website has been adjusted since it’s inception making clear cut information harder to find and in my opinion, buried. Stimulus money was also sent off to Washington, DC which I noted separately. US territories, etc. consisting of American Samoa, Federated States of Micronesia, Guam, Marshall Islands, Northern Mariana Islands, Palau, Puerto Rico, US Minor Outlying Islands, US Virgin Islands and “Unassigned” items will be ignored …for now.

To keep it simple I’ve compiled information based on monies given to our 50 states unless noted and have rounded figures.

$195.6 Billion of the $787 Billion stimulus money has been allotted to our 50 states.

If, in a perfect world it was split 50 ways it would average $3.9B per state.

If every US resident pocketed an equal share the $195.6B it would split up to be approximately $636 for each person. (extracting out the loans)

One in 459 people in the US have benefited from “job creation.”

By comparison, $3.4 Billion has been rewarded to Washington, DC ($883.6M in contracts and $2.5B in grants).

$3.4 billion was awarded in the form of contracts and grants — no loans were made to Washington, DC.

One in 145 people in Washington, DC have benefited from “job creation.”

If the money funded to DC were equally distributed to each of its estimated 599,000+ residents they would each pocket about $5,670.

Other stimulus statistics
The most funding by dollar amount: California $22 billion

The least funding by dollar amount: Wyoming $538 million

State with biggest “piece of the pie” on a per resident basis of “free” money (grant and contract funds – less borrowed funds that have to be paid back): Alaska $2,419 per resident

State with smallest “piece of the pie” on a per resident basis of “free” money (grant and contract funds – less borrowed funds that have to be paid back): Florida $498 per resident

Jobs created across 50 states: 661,767 (13,235 avg. per state)

Average cost per job created: $295,600

Most jobs created: California 70,187 jobs

Least jobs created: Rhode Island 526 jobs

Highest job creation from fund dollars awarded (biggest bang for the buck): Illinois, $124,120 per job

Lowest job creation from fund dollars awarded (least bang for the buck): Rhode Island, $1,371,184 per job

Most jobs created per capita: Illinois, one in 199

Least jobs created per capita: Rhode Island, one in 1,994

By year end 2009 $174.7B was awarded and $53.8B of the $787B was received by recipients (including DC & territories)

January 1, 2010 through March 31, 2010 saw an additional $26.9B was awarded and $7.7 received by recipients.

Listings by state
The first figure below is how many residents within the state benefited from the $787 Billion stimulus through job creation.

Blue states voted for Obama while red states voted Republican.

The figure in ($  ) designates the amount of stimulus money divided by the number of jobs created [i.e. $200,000 in stimulus money created 2 jobs = ($100,000) ] as of March 31, 2010.

The final figure reflects the May 2010 Unemployment by %

**indicates states hit hardest by home foreclosures

***indicates states hit hardest by illegal immigrants

Alabama — 1 in 386 ($254,825) 10.8%
Alaska — 1 in 372 ($899,860) 8.3%
Arizona — 1 in 944 ($623,283) 9.6% ** – ***
Arkansas — 1 in 771 ($467,014) 7.7%
California — 1 in 523 ($314,562) 12.4% ** – ***
Colorado — 1 in 482 ($361,493) 8.0%
Connecticut — 1 in 456 ($244,371) 8.9%
Delaware — 1 in 644 ($524,031) 8.8%
Florida — 1 in 476 ($238,293) 11.7% ** – ***
Georgia — 1 in 305 ($169,190) 10.2%
Hawaii — 1 in 503 ($417,187) 6.6%
Idaho — 1 in 209 ($196,175) 9.0%
Illinois — 1 in 199 ($124,120) 10.8%
Indiana — 1 in 1,117 ($734,857) 10.0%
Iowa — 1 in 340 ($208,117) 6.8%
Kansas — 1 in 318 ($188,491) 6.5%
Kentucky — 1 in 252 ($150,356) 10.4%
Louisiana — 1 in 506 ($311,822) 6.9%
Maine — 1 in 761 ($532,603) 8.0%
Maryland — 1 in 837 ($645,233) 7.2%
Massachusetts — 1 in 556 ($441,153) 9.2%
Michigan — 1 in 678 ($488,157) 13.6%
Minnesota — 1 in 457 ($282,138) 7.0%
Mississippi — 1 in 422 ($313,903) 11.4%
Missouri — 1 in 335 ($213,048) 9.3%
Montana — 1 in 286 ($341,966) 7.2%
Nebraska — 1 in 484 ($300,576) 4.9%
Nevada — 1 in 545 ($311,501) 14.0% ** – ***
New Hampshire — 1 in 919 ($538,532) 6.4%
New Jersey — 1 in 450 ($261,390) 9.7%
New Mexico — 1 in 408 ($440,592) 8.4%
New York — 1 in 478 ($302,316) 8.3%
North Carolina — 1 in 376 ($211,435) 10.3%
North Dakota — 1 in 259 ($318,841) 3.6%
Ohio — 1 in 497 ($325,923) 10.7%
Oklahoma — 1 in 456 ($303,191) 6.7%
Oregon — 1 in 503 ($327,771) 10.6%
Pennsylvania — 1 in 606 ($353,022) 9.1%
Rhode Island — 1 in 1,994 ($1,371,184) 12.3%
South Carolina — 1 in 503 ($474,843) 11.0%
South Dakota — 1 in 330 ($406,914) 4.6%
Tennessee — 1 in 464 ($351,314) 10.4%
Texas — 1 in 559 ($301,490) 8.3% ***
Utah — 1 in 485 ($332,431) 7.3%
Vermont — 1 in 576 ($546,254) 6.2%
Virginia — 1 in 525 ($310,220) 7.1%
Washington — 1 in 452 ($410,146) 9.1%
West Virginia — 1 in 765 ($582,718) 8.9%
Wisconsin — 1 in 532 ($308,172) 8.2%
Wyoming — 1 in 833 ($841,839) 7.0%

District of Columbia — 1 in 145 ($823,363) 10.4%

NOTE: Twenty-eight different federal agencies have been allocated the $787 billion in recovery funds. Each agency chooses how to spend its funds.

The funds are split into three catagories:
$288B in tax benefits (56% has been awarded)
$275B in contracts, grants and loans (43% has been awarded)
$224B in entitlements (60% has been awarded)

*The spreadsheet is available for purchase.


Did GM really repay your tax dollars as announced?

April 27, 2010

General Motors: “We’re proud to announce: We’ve repaid our government loan. In full. With interest. Five years ahead of the original schedule.”

For Immediate Release
April 22, 2010
Grassley asks about GM repaying TARP loans with other TARP funds

WASHINGTON — Senator Chuck Grassley is asking the Treasury Secretary to justify claims that General Motors has repaid its TARP loans when GM is using other TARP funds to repay the loans.

“It looks like the announcement is really just an elaborate TARP money shuffle,” Grassley said. “The repayment dollars haven’t come from GM selling cars but, instead, from a TARP escrow account at the Treasury Department.”

Grassley said his concern is based upon the most recently quarterly report from the Special Inspector General for TARP. Mr. Neil Barofsky testified before the Finance Committee this week and stated that the funds GM is using to repay its TARP debt are not coming from GM earnings.

Grassley said it’s a matter of the Treasury Department being straightforward with taxpayers about its management of the $700 billion taxpayer funded TARP program. Click here to read Grassley’s letter of inquiry to Secretary Timothy Geithner.

The Special Inspector General for TARP was created at the urging of Grassley and Senator Max Baucus of Montana, and when the Treasury Department changed the focus of the program less than a month after it began, Grassley worked with Senator Claire McCaskill of Missouri to retool the Inspector General’s authority and empower the office to adequately scrutinize TARP spending and management.

Grassley has gone to bat for the Inspector General throughout the year, when the White House and Treasury Department put up barriers to the Inspector General asking questions and collecting information about where the money has gone. Grassley has been an outspoken critic about the lack of transparency with how TARP funds have been used. Last fall, he cosponsored legislation to end the program.